You may think you're organised, but you still might be guilty of keeping these items around. Here's what to throw out today!

Even if you’re a master of kitchen organisation, it’s hard to know what can stay, and what needs to go. Odds are, there are items and food you probably shouldn’t keep in your kitchen cupboards. Let’s get to tossing.

Shopping bags and plastic

Shopping bags and plastic

Even though there is a ban on plastic shopping bags, you still seem to accumulate plenty of bags; sometimes you forget your reusable shopping bags and end up coming home with thick plastic, paper or more reusable shopping bags. But there are also the other bags that might come in handy one day, think bread bags (which can be reused instead of buying plastic wrap). These you ultimately stuff in drawers, under the sink, and anywhere else you can squeeze them, but you never seem to be able to reuse the amount you have stored away. Clear some space in your kitchen by storing shopping bags in your car boot, shopping trolley or a cupboard just for this purpose, and bin some of the small plastic bags lurking under the kitchen cupboard so you only have an amount you can actually reuse.

Scratched-up chopping board

Scratched-up chopping board

Much like kitchen appliances, your chopping board has a shelf life. All that cutting of veggies and fruit has probably given your board plenty of cracks and scratches, and bacteria has likely found a home in those deep grooves. Unless you are cleaning your cutting board regularly, you may need to replace it more often.

Freezer-burnt food

Freezer-burnt food

Just because putting food in the freezer helps it last longer, doesn’t mean it lasts forever! While the freezer can keep your food good for a few months, if your items look like they’ve got stuck in a snowstorm, you can bet they’re not going to taste as good as they should.

Take-away menus

Take-away menus

Although your take-away food usually comes with a menu or two, the reality is, you end up stuffing all that wasted paper in a drawer, and before you know it, it’s hard for you to close your kitchen drawer. Plus, those menus are probably available online, so toss them!

Expired or separated condiments

Expired or separated condiments

You may be quick to throw out mouldy strawberries in the fridge, but what about the condiments taking up space on the fridge door? It’s easy to forget that things that come in a jar also have a shelf life. Spring-clean your kitchen staples by checking that bottle of sauce’s best-used-by date, and seeing if the ingredients have begun to separate or smell funny.

Scratched non-stick pans

Scratched non-stick pans

The point of non-stick pans is to keep those scrambled eggs and pan-seared chicken from crusting to the pan, leaving you with less to clean. But if the pan has scratches, it’s no longer non-stick, and therefore not doing its job!

Old spices

Old spices

If you’ve had your spices hanging around for a year, it’s time to swap them out for new ones. Spices lose their potency and flavour over time, so you don’t need to feel guilty about giving up a half-full jar, because it’s no good anyway.

Unused cleaners

Unused cleaners

Household cleaners have a shelf life, and if you’re not using them regularly, you’re certainly wasting your money on them. Pinpoint the cleaners you know you need, and make sure they’re still good. Multi-purpose surface cleaners have a shelf life of about two years, dishwashing detergent between 12 and 18 months, and metal polish up to two years.

Disposable cutlery

Disposable cutlery

You have more than likely procured quite a stack of disposable cutlery and chopsticks in your drawer from take away meals, but if you’re not going to use them, why keep them around? Corn starch and bamboo cutlery can go in the compost or garden bin. Check if other disposable cutlery can be deposited in the recycling big. And next time you order in, tell the restaurant not hold the knives, forks and chopsticks.

Chipped plates, bowls, mugs

Chipped plates, bowls, mugs
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Just because your plates can still hold food doesn’t mean you should use them. If your plates, bowls, mugs, or other dishware have chips, not only can they cut you, they can harbour bacteria and increase your exposure to lead.

The junk drawer

The junk drawer

It goes without saying that a junk drawer goes from being a place for miscellaneous items to an overflowing space holding more nonessential items than stuff you want easy access to. Go through it quarterly, making sure anything that’s in there is something you truly need. The rest you can toss, like extra rubber bands, bread ties, business cards etc.

7 Comments

  1. plastik kt rumah tu dah ad 2 beg...ehhh, rase nk buang pulak, tp bila nk guna..xd plastik nanti..hahaha

    ReplyDelete
  2. plastik bag selalu guna utk isi sampah...tapi x mesra-alam...

    ReplyDelete
  3. bnyak simpan plastik sebab nak recycle balik.. yg besar ltak dalam bakaul sampah..yang kecik2 utk ambik rambut kt lubang air bilik air..:)

    ReplyDelete
  4. apa yg xguna buang saja xyah menyemak dapur

    ReplyDelete
  5. bab plastik tu memang betul sgt.. tu kadang2 MA bawa kuar bag aje masa shopping..sbb nak kurangkan penggunaan plastik

    ReplyDelete
  6. Berhubung saya sangaaaaat suka buang2 barang, melihat tumpukan di atas, benar2 membuat gatal tangan saya untuk bersih2 😂😂.

    Tak suka memang lihat timpukan barang tak berguna. Pasti saya buang. Expiry date dari tiap bumbu dan makanan pun saya cek teratur. Kan enak yaa kalo lihat dapur atau rumah rapi dan tak menumpuk barang👍

    ReplyDelete

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